Department of History and Political Science

Department website: https://www.vanguard.edu/academics/academic-programs/undergrad/history-and-political-science

Mission: The Department of History and Political Science engages students with these two disciplines in the context of a Christian worldview. Students will become familiar with the cultural, political, economic, social, and religious development of world civilizations. This familiarity will enhance their ability to understand and evaluate the historical origins of contemporary society and culture as well as the political processes of human social institutions. Serious engagement with a body of literature and schools of thought will deepen students’ appreciation for the past, serve as a gateway to the present, and provide the intellectual tools for further study.

Program Learning Outcomes for the Department of History and Political Science are:

  1. Describe the cultural, political, economic, social and religious development of world civilizations.
  2. Analyze the historical origins of contemporary society and culture.
  3. Explain the political processes of human social institutions.
  4. Engage the literature and schools of thought of the two disciplines.
  5. Engage the two disciplines in the context of a Christian worldview.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to put their thoughts into solid, well-written, well-documented prose.

Major:

Minor:

Interdisciplinary Minor:

These minors are intended to be an interdisciplinary course of study administered by the Department of Sociology in collaboration with other academic units.  The minor is designed to provide students a theoretical and practical overview of the topic in society from the perspective of various disciplines.

NOTE: Some of the courses listed below may be applicable to general education requirements within the Professional Studies/Non-Traditional Education program (e.g. POLS-155 U.S. Government).  Questions, contact the Department of History and Political Science or the Registrar's Office.


History

HIST-156C  U.S. History  3 Credits  

A study of the United States from colonial times to the present, seeking to help the student develop an understanding of the growth of the institutions and culture of the nation, and gain insight into the similarities and differences of people of different times, classes, and ethnicity. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite for upper division U.S. History courses.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

HIST-203C  World Civilizations I  3 Credits  

Emphasizes the development of the basic ideas, institutions, individuals, and the outstanding cultural, economic, political, and social movements that have shaped humanity from ancient times. The course divides in 1648. Students may take either course to fulfill the core curriculum requirement. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite for upper division non-U.S. History courses. May be taken as an honors course.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

HIST-204C  World Civilization II  3 Credits  

Emphasizes the development of the basic ideas, institutions, individuals, and the outstanding cultural, economic, political, and social movements that have shaped humanity from ancient times. The course divides in 1648. Students may take either course to fulfill the core curriculum requirement. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite for upper division non-U.S. History courses. May be taken as an honors course.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

HIST-262  Research Methods in Hist/Poli Science  3 Credits  

This course is cross listed with POLS-262. Writing intensive class which will teach students proper research techniques and the different aspects of History and Political Science scholarship. Class will focus on how to write a major research paper, book reviews, and other scholarly works. Prerequisite for upper-division History and Political Science courses. Satisfies ENGL-220C requirement. Students are expected to take HIST-262 or POLS-262, but if ENGL-220C was taken before a History & Political Science major was declared, it will be an acceptable substitution. Must be passed with a "C" (not a "C-") or better to fulfill the core curriculum requirement.

Prerequisite: ENGL-120C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

HIST-275  Topics in American History  3 Credits  

A study of five periods in American history emphasizing the development of a distinctive American culture. This course meets the Social Science requirement for the Professional Studies Program.

HIST-302  Twentieth-Century Europe  3 Credits  

The history of Europe in the twentieth century and beyond, including political, military, economic, religious, social, and intellectual aspects.

HIST-310  History of Baseball  3 Credits  

A study of America's national pastime from its mythical beginnings to its 21st-century role in American society. Includes political, sociological, economic, literary, and statistical elements.

HIST-316  Teaching History/Multicultural Setting  3 Credits  

This course is cross listed with EDUC-315. Students seeking to complete the subject matter program in Social Science must take this class as part of that program to ensure that they are integrating historical content with their pedagogical experience. This course provides the philosophical background and classroom experience necessary to introduce a person to the teaching profession in a public or private school in a multicultural environment. The purpose of the class is to assist the student to gain an understanding of the resources and challenges facing a teacher serving a linguistically and culturally diverse student population. Discussion will focus on the major professional organizations and educational research related to the philosophical, historical, and demographic developments of American education. Students will complete a 30-hour field work component to observe classroom management and organization, Specially Designed Academic Instruction Delivered in English (SDAIE) instructional practices, and the curricula of grades K-12. The role and function of Christian beliefs and values in the public school will be integrated throughout the course. This course is a prerequisite requirement for the Single Subject Credential program Lab fee.

HIST-317  Modern China  3 Credits  

A study of the political and social history of China from the mid-nineteenth century, when European aggression forced China on a path to modernization, to the present. (per 2020 Academic Catalog, this course no longer cross lists with ANTH-317).

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

HIST-319  Imperial China  3 Credits  

A study of the political and social history of China from earliest times until the mid-nineteenth century.

HIST-322  History of England  3 Credits  

A study of English history from the advent of the Tudors until the present, emphasizing the development of ideas and significant political, social, and economic institutions.

HIST-323  The British Empire  3 Credits  

The history of the British Empire, from its beginnings in the sixteenth century to decolonization in the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis on cultural exchanges, imperialism, and how the empire shaped our modern world.

HIST-339  Area Studies:  3 Credits  

This course is cross listed with ANTH-339. Area Studies is an intensive examination of specific regions of the world. Each course gives a brief survey of the region with attention to cultural history, ethnicity, family structure, political organization, technology, social structure, ethnopsychology, economics and ideologies present within the region. Issues of cultural difference and commonality, regional minority sub-cultural groups, and the role that this region plays within "global" culture are also addressed. (This course may be repeated for credit.) Areas of study in the rotation may include: Latin America, Pacific Rim, Japan, Middle East, Oceania, East Asia, South East Asia, China, Korea, Northern Africa, Sub-Sahara Africa, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, North America, and North America Diaspora.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

HIST-345  The Birth of Modern Europe  3 Credits  

Traces the development of ideas and events in Europe that shattered the old order and created modernity from 1648-1900. Major topics include the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, liberal political revolutions, the industrial revolution,nationalism, and imperialism.

HIST-346  Ancient Greece and Rome  3 Credits  

Neolithic background of Greece; Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations; the rise of city states, and classical Greek civilization to the Macedonian conquest of Alexander the Great. The life of post-Alexander Greek states and their collapse in the face of Roman growth. Roman civilization from republic to empire concluding with the collapse of their rule in 476 A.D. Latin culture, politics, and the growth of Christianity will be studied.

HIST-350  U.S. Military History  3 Credits  

Traces the course of American military developments from the Revolution to the present, focusing on wars and with a special emphasis on Christian perspectives.

HIST-356  History and Geography of California  3 Credits  

A study of California from pre-Spanish times to the present, with emphasis on political, economic, and social developments and on its physical, political, and human geography.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

HIST-358  The Revolutionary Atlantic  3 Credits  

The English Civil War and Glorious Revolution, the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and Latin American Revolutions in comparative context.

HIST-360  Women in American History  3 Credits  

A survey of the role of women in the development of the nation, including the lives of average women and a look at some of the pioneers who reshaped attitudes about women's proper sphere.

HIST-363  America From Colony to Nation  3 Credits  

The history of the thirteen English colonies in America from their beginnings through the American revolution and ending with the conclusion of the War of 1812. This seminar class will focus on specific topics such as the growth of slavery, religion, politics, and Revolutionary War, and the constitutional debates.

HIST-366  The History of Human Rights  3 Credits  

The history of the philosophy, laws, and religious precepts relating to the question of how human beings ought to be treated, from the ancient world to the present. The class culminates in a human rights advocacy project.

HIST-370  Wars of America  3 Credits  

Examines the Civil War, World War II or the Vietnam War in depth. May be repeated for credit.

HIST-373  U.S. 1945-1963: Good Old Days  3 Credits  

Explores political, social, economic, and cultural developments in the days of the high Cold War.

HIST-374  U.S. Since 1963: Contemp America History History  3 Credits  

Traces the loss of consensus through the sixties, Vietnam, Watergate, the end of the Cold War, and beyond.

HIST-425  Topics/Amer Relg Hist:  3 Credits  

The class will focus on one topic particular to American religious history and study it in detail. The topics could include: women in American religious history, new religions and cults, evangelical Christian culture in America, specific religious groups such as the Puritans or evangelicals.

HIST-428  The History of Childhood  3 Credits  

An advanced research seminar in which students combine age as a category of historical analysis. Students produce article-length papers of original research on a topic of their choice related to the experiences of children or ideas regarding childhood in history.

HIST-450  History Teaching Internship  1-3 Credits  

Regular hours each week for classes and/or meetings are established at the beginning of the semester. The intern assists an instructor in planning and conducting a course and/or laboratory session. Maximum of three units. (Maximum six units for HIST-450, POLS-450, HIST-454, POLS-454,HIST-457 and POLS-457.)

HIST-451  Renaissance and Reformation  3 Credits  

The transition from medieval to modern civilization, emphasizing those forces and persons that brought about change in Europe's intellectual and religious outlook.

HIST-454  History and Political Science Internship  1-3 Credits  

Internship with Vanguard University, local museum, archives, government office, or political campaign. Maximum of three units. (Maximum six units for HIST-450, POLS-450, HIST-454, POLS-454, HIST-457, and POLS-457.)

HIST-457  Research Assistantship  1-3 Credits  

Advanced work in research in History in an on-going project with the cooperation and supervision of a faculty member. Students will meet with instructor weekly to discuss findings and progress. Maximum three units. (Maximum six units for HIST-450, POLS-450, HIST-454, POLS-454, HIST-457, and POLS-457.)

HIST-469  Special Topic: U.S.:  1-3 Credits  

Experimental or occasional courses not offered on a regular basis. May be repeated for credit.

HIST-470  Special Topic: Non-U.S.  1-3 Credits  

Experimental or occasional courses not offered on a regular basis. May be repeated for credit.

HIST-480  Individual Studies:  1-4 Credits  

May be repeated for credit. Consent of hte instructor and department chair required.

HIST-485C  Historiography  3 Credits  

A capstone course that traces the evolution of historical theory, interpretation, and practice. Seminar format. Includes focus on integration of faith and learning within the discipline. Culminates with students developing their own philosophies of history. This course fulfills the Core Curriculum Capstone requirement for History majors.

Political Science

POLS-155  U.S. Government  3 Credits  

Designed to acquaint the student with the United States political system, including constitutional developments of the United States and of California, and stimulate reflection on the intersection of Christianity and citizenship. This course will meet the Social Science requirement in the Professional Studies Program.

POLS-155C  American Democracy  3 Credits  

Designed to acquaint the student with the United States political system, including constitutional developments of the United States and of California, and stimulate reflection on the intersection of Christianity and citizenship. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite for upper-division U.S. Government classes. (formerly titled U.S. Government; see 2019 Academic Catalog)

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

POLS-240  Economics  3 Credits  

The course begins with an examination of influential economic philosophies and the debates they have sparked. How do societies encourage economic growth, allocate resources, protect and help the poor, and balance competing economic claims? How do domestic policy choices affect other countries? By studying basic economic principles and case studies that highlight economic challenges around the world, students will learn to see the complexity of economic and political choices.

POLS-262  Research Methods in Hist/Poli Science  3 Credits  

This course is cross listed with HIST-262. Writing intensive class which will teach students proper research techniques and the different aspects of History and Political Science scholarship. Class will focus on how to write a major research paper, book reviews, and other scholarly works. Prerequisite for upper-division History and Political Science courses. Satisfies ENGL-220C requirement. Students are expected to take HIST-262 or POLS-262, but if ENGL-220C was taken before a History & Political Science major was declared, it will be an acceptable substitution. Must be passed with a "C" (not a "C-") or better to fulfill the core curriculum requirement.

Prerequisite: ENGL-120C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

POLS-303  Classical Political Thought  3 Credits  

This course is devoted to classical questions on the relationship between "the city and man," expressed in the ancient texts of Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine. Students will explore the themes of the good life and the best regime, the relationship between justice and corruption, and the role of politics in the pursuit of human happiness. (This course is currently in teach out. See POLS-324.)

POLS-313  American Political Thought  3 Credits  

This class is a study of political philosophy from the time of the American founding to the 1960s. Students examine the works of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Abraham Lincoln, as well as the defenders of laissez-faire capitalism, American socialism and nationalism, and the supporters and critics of American democracy in the twentieth century. (This course is currently in teach out. See POLS-324.)

POLS-323  Christian Political Thought  3 Credits  

This class is a study of the complex relationship between church and state, the Kingdom of Heaven as it relates to earthly kingdoms, and what civil law means in light of grace, as understood by major Christian philosophers in church history. Students examine scripture, as well as the writings of Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, the American Puritans, and contemporary thinkers. (This course is currently in teach out. See POLS-324.)

POLS-324  Comparative Political Thought  3 Credits  

A historical review of Classical, American, Christian, and Modern political thought from Plato to present.

Terms Typically Offered: , even years.

POLS-330  Race, Identity & Politics  3 Credits  

Examines the impact of race, ethnicity, and identity in American politics and policy; surveys political attitudes, behavior, and experiences of Americans of African, Asian and Latinx descent.

Terms Typically Offered: , even years.

POLS-331  Immigrants in American Politics  3 Credits  

Historical examination of how various institutional attitudes and policies toward immigrants produce different political integration outcomes among African, Asian, European, and Latinx immigrants; evaluation of American democratic institutions' interactions with America's newest arrivals and future citizens.

Terms Typically Offered: , even years.

POLS-332  Gender & Politics  3 Credits  

Examines the relationship between gender and political participation and representation; explores inequalities and how gender hierarchy is produced and reproduced through socio-cultural, economic, and political practices and structures.

Terms Typically Offered: , even years.

POLS-333  Modern Political Thought  3 Credits  

This class is a study of the origins of the state, human rights, personal liberty, and the idea of progress. Students examine primary texts in political philosophy, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Edmund Burke, and John Stuart Mill, in order to become familiar with the development of modernity and how it shapes our own outlook on politics, morality and faith. (This course is currently in teach out. See POLS-324.)

POLS-334  Latinx Politics  3 Credits  

Explores historical and contemporary pursuit of integration of Latinx Americans into the political system; examines issues of representation, citizenship and belonging, political attitudes, electoral behavior, and policy preferences.

POLS-345  U.S. Foreign Policy  3 Credits  

Principles, practice, and ethical issues of United States foreign policymaking. Particular emphasis on the policymaking process.

POLS-360  American Politics and Elections  3 Credits  

This course is devoted to the institutions, practices, and history of how Americans choose their presidents and other representatives. Students examine voting behavior, the nomination process, and the cultural, social, and economic impact of campaigns, as well as controversies surrounding campaign finance, polling, and the media. Offered fall in even-numbered years, with focus more on the presidential races in presidential election years. (This course is currently in teach out. See POLS-361.)

POLS-361  Political Parties, Campaigns & Elections  3 Credits  

Organizations and function of political parties, nominations, elections, tactics of campaigning and campaign finance; explores mass political attitudes and behavior of American electorate. (course formerly POLS-360 American Politics and Elections; see 2019 Academic Catalog)

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

POLS-370  Constitutional Law  3 Credits  

This course is devoted to the U.S. Supreme Court. We will examine the Court as an institution, its historical development, and the way it works today. We will meet particular justices throughout the Court's history, and examine their roles and judicial philosophies. The class will then study the Court's most important rulings, and consider how they shaped the power of the federal government, its relationship with the states, as well as its protection of civil rights and liberties, and the shape of our national life.

POLS-438  Comparative Politics  3 Credits  

Comparative politics is the study of political systems around the world. Students will examine the theoretical background of various regime types, the history of modern nation-states, and survey a variety of existing political systems. Students will consider the difference between autocracy and democracy, the causes of poverty and development, and the consequences of the way power is distributed and checked within any society.

POLS-446  Public Policy Issues  3 Credits  

A conclusion to the institutions classes (Congress, the Presidency and Constitutional Law), this course is a study of major laws and their effect on society, with particular attention devoted to immigration, poverty, education and healthcare. Throughout, students will consider the cost-benefit analysis, public administration, policy assessment, and the various views about concepts of the public good.

POLS-450  Political Science Teaching Internship  1-3 Credits  

Regular hours each week for classes and/or meetings are established at the beginning of the semester. The intern assists an instructor in planning and conducting a course and/or laboratory session. Maximum of three units. (Maximum six units for HIST-450, POLS-450, HIST-454, POLS-454, HIST-457, and POLS-457.)

POLS-454  History/Political Science Internship  1-3 Credits  

Internship with Vanguard University, local museum, archives, government office, or political campaign. Maximum of three units. (Maximum six units for HIST-450, POLS-450, HIST-454, POLS-454, HIST-457, and POLS-457.)

POLS-456  U.S. Congress and Representation  3 Credits  

Exploration of theoretical concept of representation; motivations and behavior of Members of Congress; impact of money and interest groups on legislative bills and campaigning. (course formerly titled United States Congress; 2019 Academic Catalog)

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

POLS-457  Research Assistantship  1-3 Credits  

Advanced work in research in Political Science in an on-going project with the cooperation and supervision of a faculty member. Students will meet with instructor weekly to discuss findings and progress. Maximum three units. (Maximum six units for HIST-450, POLS-450, HIST-454, POLS-454, HIST-457, and POLS-457.)

POLS-469  Special Topic: U.S.:  1-3 Credits  

Experimental or occasional courses not offered on a regular basis. May be repeated for credit.

POLS-470  Special Topic: Non-U.S.:  1-3 Credits  

Experimental or occasional courses not offered on a regular basis. May be repeated for credit.

POLS-472  U.S. Presidents and the Presidency  3 Credits  

Historical development and operation of the Presidency as an institution, examines sources of presidential power, recent leadership styles and decision-making within the presidency. (course formerly titled United States Presidency; see 2019 Academic Catalog)

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

POLS-480  Individual Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit. Cosent of the instructor and the department chair is required.

POLS-482  International Politics  3 Credits  

Examination of the concepts and principles of the international political system.