Department of Theology (College)

Department website: https://www.vanguard.edu/academics/academic-programs/undergrad/religion

Mission: The Division of Theology is committed to educating students who, in becoming people like Jesus, will do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly in a world being redeemed by God.

The Division of Theology focuses on the study of Scripture, theology, and servant leadership rooted in spiritual formation within the Pentecostal tradition. We prepare women and men to flourish in their callings and ministries through a relational journey with professors and students in undergraduate, graduate, and professional studies programs across multiple learning modalities.

Undergraduate Concentrations: Biblical Studies; Christian Formation and Discipleship Studies; Intercultural Studies; Pastoral Leadership Studies; Youth Leadership Studies; and General Christian Studies.

Professional Studies Program: Ministry and Leadership

Graduate Degree Programs: Master of Arts in Theology; and Master of Arts in Leadership (with concentrations in Spirituality, Hispanic Leadership, and Women & Justice). 

All Theology majors are expected to make satisfactory academic progress toward graduation. In addition to the requirements established by the university, the Department of Theology requires that all of its majors maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.0 in all major course work as part of their minimum requirement for graduation.

Ministerial Credentials 

Students who plan to apply for ministerial credentials should consult the chair of the Department of Theology for pertinent information and the necessary application forms. PLST-449 Denominational Polity is recommended as one unit toward fulfilling the pastoral ministries requirement in the programs of those students planning to apply for ministerial credentials with the Assemblies of God.

Ministerial Internship Programs and Practicum

The Department of Theology is committed to provide field education experiences that integrate conceptual aspects of ministry with the practice of ministry in local churches, hospitals, mission opportunities, inner-city ministries, and other parachurch organizations. Goals for field education include spiritual formation, mentoring relationships, theological reflection, and specific training in ministry skills that provide the framework for such integration.

There are two academic programs designed to provide these integrative experiences:

  1. PLST-450 Ministerial Internship (3-12 units) is a structured field experience designed for students who wish to have an in-depth exposure to the practice of ministry within a local church under the supervision of a pastor and theology faculty member.
  2. PLST-460 Practicum (1-3 units) is intended for students who are currently involved in a particular ministry and wish to receive credit for guided reflection and supervision of that experience by the on-scene administrator and theology faculty member.

The deadline for admission in the Ministerial Internship Program for the Summer or Fall semester is April 15 of the preceding Spring semester. For the Spring semester, the deadline is November 15 of the preceding Fall semester. The deadline for a practicum is the first week of the semester. Application forms are available in the Department of Theology office.

Program Student Learning Outcomes

1. Bible: The student will analyze and interpret a biblical text, using sound methodology, and will explain its meaning and relevance. 

2. Theology: Students will analyze and evaluate a theological proposal that spans major theological loci in terms of its Biblical foundation, coherence and ministry/contextual relevance.

3. Christian Ethics: Students will articulate an approach to making ethical decisions that is informed by both ethical theory and the teaching of Scripture. 

4. The Church: Students will articulate an understanding of the church’s identity and history as a Spirit formed community of the people of God and the church’s purpose as disciple-making towards Christlikeness.

5. Leadership: Students will apply the role of spiritual formation in servant leadership in supporting Christ’s reconciling mission for the sake of the world.

6. Missions: Students will articulate missiological and intercultural theories, principles, and strategies and effectively apply them within diverse intercultural contexts.

NOTE: The 2020-2021 Academic Year will be the final year that academic degree listed as "Bachelor of Arts in Religion" will be offered and listed on diplomas and transcripts.  Effective the 2021-2022 Academic Year, diplomas issued for the Department of Theology will state "Bachelor of Arts in Theology"; transcripts will also reflect this change in the academic degree name. This is a degree name change only and will not impact academic course numbers or academic program requirements. Questions, contact the Office of the Registrar.


MAJOR:

MINOR:

CERTIFICATE:

 

Biblical Interpretation

BINT-270  Resrch Meth/Study of Scripture  3 Credits  

An introductory examination of biblical exposition for ministry which includes an understanding of the theological foundations for preaching, an acquaintance with the basic secondary materials used in biblical interpretation, and an overview of the procedures of biblical exegesis. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Prerequisite: BLAN-101, NT-101C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

BINT-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic in Biblical Interpretation. May be repeated for credit.

BINT-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic in Biblical Interpretation. May be repeated for credit.

BINT-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in Biblical Interpretation. May be repeated for credit.

BINT-440  New Testament Backgrounds  3 Credits  

A study of the Greek, Roman, and Jewish backgrounds of the New Testament is made in order to give the New Testament student an understanding of the world of Jesus and the early church. Extensive readings in representative texts from the New Testament period, including the Dead Sea Scrolls.

BINT-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study in a special topic in the field of Biblical interpretation. May be repeated for credit.

BINT-476  Old Testament Backgrounds  3 Credits  

An exploration of Egyptian, Babylonian, Assyrian, and Persian backgrounds to the Old Testament, designed to provide the student with an understanding of the Old Testament world.

BINT-480  Individual Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

Biblical Language

BLAN-101  Introduction to Biblical Lang.  3 Credits  

An introduction to the Greek and Hebrew languages which prepares students to do basic lexical and grammatical research in both print and digital media. Core requirement for the religion major and prerequisite to BINT-270. Offered every semester.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

BLAN-201  Beginning Greek I  4 Credits  

A two-semester course of instruction in the grammar of the Greek New Testament. BLAN 201 or demonstrated proficiency serves as prerequisite to BLAN 202. By the end of the second semester the student should be translating portions of the Greek New Testament. Offered alternate years.

Prerequisite: BLAN-101 or permission of the instructor

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

BLAN-202  Beginning Greek II  4 Credits  

A two-semester course of instruction in the grammar of the Greek New Testament. BLAN-201 or demonstrated proficiency serves as prerequisite to BLAN-202. By the end of the second semester the student should be translating portions of the Greek New Testament. Offered alternate years.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring, even years.

BLAN-204  Beginning Hebrew I  4 Credits  

Foundation in the basics of Hebrew morphology, vocabulary, and syntax. Exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. Three hours of lecture, two of laboratory per week. BLAN-204 or demonstrated proficiency serves as prerequisite to BLAN-205. Offered alternate years.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

BLAN-205  Beginning Hebrew II  4 Credits  

Foundation in the basics of Hebrew morphology, vocabulary, and syntax. Exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. Three hours of lecture, two of laboratory per week. BLAN-204 or demonstrated proficiency serves as prerequisite to BLAN-205. Offered alternate years.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

BLAN-301  Intermediate Greek I  3 Credits  

An advanced course in New Testament Greek. The student begins a translation and exegesis of the Gospel of John along with an intensive, systematic review of grammar and syntax from an advanced Greek grammar.

Prerequisite: BLAN-201, BLAN-202 or demonstrated proficiency

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

BLAN-302  Intermediate Greek II  3 Credits  

An advanced course in New Testament Greek. The student begins a translation and exegesis of the Gospel of John along with an intensive, systematic review of grammar and syntax from an advanced Greek grammar.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

BLAN-306  Intermediate Hebrew I  3 Credits  

Review and consolidation of grammar and syntax. Extensive reading in the narrative portions of the Old Testament for style and vocabulary. Offered alternate years.

Prerequisite: BLAN-204, BLAN-205 or demonstrated proficiency

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

BLAN-307  Intermediate Hebrew II  3 Credits  

Review and consolidation of grammar and syntax. Extensive reading in the narrative portions of the Old Testament for style and vocabulary. Offered alternate years.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

BLAN-401  Advanced Greek I  2 Credits  

Reading and exegesis of Greek New Testament passages, selected to acquaint the student with the distinctive styles of the various authors of the New Testament. Some reading in the Apostolic Fathers and the Septuagint is also included.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

BLAN-402  Advanced Greek II  2 Credits  

Reading and exegesis of Greek New Testament passages, selected to acquaint the student with the distinctive styles of the various authors of the New Testament. Some reading in the Apostolic Fathers and the Septuagint is also included.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

BLAN-406  Advanced Hebrew I  2 Credits  

Syntactical and exegetical analysis of selected portions from the Hebrew Old Testament. Offered on demand.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

BLAN-407  Advanced Hebrew II  2 Credits  

Syntactical and exegetical analysis of selected portions from the Hebrew Old Testament. Offered on demand.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

BLAN-480  Individual Studies:  1-4 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

Christian Formation and Discipleship

CFST-101  Intro/Chrstn Formtn/Discplshp  2 Credits  

An examination of the theology, philosophy and practice of spiritual formation and discipleship. Special attention will be given to the nature, processes, and goals of Christian formation ministries in the local church. Offered every fall.

Prerequisite: NT-101C, OT-201C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

CFST-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study in a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

CFST-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study in a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

CFST-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study in a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

CFST-322  Christn Formation of Children  2 Credits  

A study of the developmental needs, skills, and abilities of children as they pertain to spiritual formation. Consideration will also be given to moral and value formation, socialization, and self-esteem development.

CFST-326  Adult Formation/Discipleship  2 Credits  

A study of the educational, discipleship, and developmental needs of adults pertinent to an effective formation ministry in the local church.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

CFST-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study in a special topic in the field of Christian formation and discipleship. May be repeated for credit.

CFST-480  Ind Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

 Church History

CHIS-340  Late Roman-Byzantine Empire  3 Credits  

Beginning in the late third century, this course covers the major people, places, events, and movements of the Roman Empire until its destruction by the Ottoman Turks in 1453. Emphasizes the life and beliefs of the Orthodox Church and its relationship to Western Christianity. This course is housed in the Department of Religion and is accepted as a HIST upper division elective for the History/ Political Science major.

CHIS-400C  Christian Heritage  3 Credits  

This course explores our Christian heritage, showing how the community of believers has evolved over time, from the timeless creeds developed in the early Christian era, to the split between Rome and Eastern Orthodoxy, to the Protestant Reformation and the proliferation of denominations down to the twentieth century. The recent period highlights the rise of Pentecostalism and its place in the past century, the increasingly global sweep of the Church, and the relative decline of the European role in Christianity. The last section deals with the challenges and prospects of the twenty-first century and the roles available to our students.

CHIS-400H  Christian Heritage  3 Credits  

This course explores our Christian heritage, showing how the community of believers has evolved over time, from the timeless creeds developed in the early Christian era, to the split between Rome and Eastern Orthodoxy, to the Protestant Reformation and the proliferation of denominations down to the twentieth century. The recent period highlights the rise of Pentecostalism and its place in the past century, the increasingly global sweep of the Church, and the relative decline of the European role in Christianity. The last section deals with the challenges and prospects of the twenty-first century and the roles available to our students.

CHIS-420  History of Pentecostalism  3 Credits  

Antecedents, Wesleyan and nineteenth-century holiness backgrounds; origin, development, and varieties of traditional Pentecostalism; some attention to the neo-Pentecostal or charismatic movement. Course may include field trips to significant Southern California sites. This course is housed in the Department of Religion and is accepted as a HIST upper division elective for the History/ Political Science major.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

CHIS-451  Renaissance & Reformation  3 Credits  

The transition from medieval to modern civilization, emphasizing those forces and persons which brought about change in Europe's intellectual and religious outlook.

CHIS-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in church history. May be repeated for credit.

CHIS-480  Individual Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

CHIS-490  Seminar:  3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in church history of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

Intercultural Studies 

ICST-102  Intro/Intercultural Studies  3 Credits  

An introduction to the basic elements of intercultural communication and service. Course content will compare and contrast the cognitive processes, linguistic forms, and behavioral patterns within diverse cultural contexts. The student will integrate theory with practice in order to communicate effectively a holistic gospel.

ICST-272  Theology/Church Mission  2 Credits  

Various models of Christian mission from biblical, theological, and historical perspectives will be explored. This interdisciplinary study, integrating theology and praxis, is designed to move the student toward a responsible understanding of an integral proclamation of the kingdom of God in a diverse cultural milieu. Core requirement for the religion major offered every fall.

Prerequisite: NT-101C; THEO-101C OR THEO-103C/103H

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

ICST-288  Theology in an Intercultural Context  3 Credits  

A study of worldview theories and concepts in the context of intercultural studies. Major worldviews are mapped out geographically in order to investigate transcultural universals and divergences. The relationship between worldviews and theology in formulating contextual understandings of ministry will be examined. Core requirement for the religion major offered every fall.

Prerequisite: NT-101C; THEO-101C or THEO-103C/H

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

ICST-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic in intercultural and urban studies. May be repeated for credit.

ICST-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic in intercultural and urban studies. May be repeated for credit.

ICST-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in intercultural and urban studies. May be repeated for credit.

ICST-305  Evangelism  3 Credits  

A study of the nature, scope and imperatives of evangelism in the church. Scriptural mandates and models for evangelism are examined, and personal skills in evangelism are developed.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

ICST-345  Intercultural Comm in Ministry  3 Credits  

A study of the processes of communicating the gospel interculturally. Special attention is given to the development of attitudes and tools that will enable effective communication interculturally.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

ICST-370  Language Intensive  3 Credits  

A course designed to offer Religion majors in the Intercultural Studies concentration intensive language study as part of their required study abroad experience. The specific language studied will be in conjunction with the location of the selected study abroad program.

ICST-450  Intercultural Internship  3-12 Credits  

Intercultural Internship is designed to integrate conceptual aspects of ministry with in-depth exposure to the practice of ministry within specific intercultural contexts. The internship experience is intended for students who wish to receive credit for guided reflection and supervision of a missions oriented experience by the on-scene supervisor/missionary and religion faculty member. Specific internship modules may also be taken during two, three, or four semesters. A maximum number of twelve units may be taken for internship credit.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

ICST-460  Intercultural Field Studies  3 Credits  

A course designed to integrate theory with field experience for Religion majors in the Intercultural Studies concentration. The intent is to reflect theologically in an intercultural ministry setting as part of the study abroad requirement. Special attention is given to examining one's spiritual gifts, calling, identity, and preparation, as well as developing an appreciation for other cultures, and understanding of the cross-cultural adaptation of a missionary.

ICST-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in intercultural and urban studies. May be repeated for credit.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

ICST-480  Ind Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

ICST-485  Current Issues/Mission Studies  3 Credits  

This course examines selected themes critical to effective Christian mission. Issues considered range from the ethics of evangelism and proselytism to the cultural dynamics of politics and economics. This course is required for students in the in the Intercultural Studies concentration.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

ICST-490  Seminar:  1-3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in intercultural and urban studies of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

New Testament

NT-101  New Testament Survey  3 Credits  

Prerequisite to all upper division courses in New Testament. A close study of the New Testament text, examining the foundations of Christianity within its historical contexts, and presenting the principles and tools of interpretation. (required for all Religion majors; meets Religion/Humanities requirement for all majors)

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

NT-101C  New Testament Survey  3 Credits  

Prerequisite to all upper division courses in New Testament. A close study of the New Testament text, examining the foundations of Christianity within its historical contexts, and presenting the principles and tools of interpretation.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

NT-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic relating to the New Testament. May be repeated for credit.

NT-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic relating to the New Testament. May be repeated for credit.

NT-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic relating to the New Testament. May be repeated for credit.

NT-301  Intermediate Greek I  3 Credits  

An advanced course in New Testament Greek. The student begins a translation and exegesis of the Gospel of John along with an intensive, systematic review of grammar and syntax from an advanced Greek grammar.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-302  Intermediate Greek II  3 Credits  

An advanced course in New Testament Greek. The student begins a translation and exegesis of the Gospel of John along with an intensive, systematic review of grammar and syntax from an advanced Greek grammar.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-310  Parables of Jesus  3 Credits  

This course aims to provide an introductory overview of the critical problems involved in interpreting the parables of Jesus, an understanding of the theological framework for interpreting the meaning of the parables, and an appreciation for the religious, social, and moral values expressed in the message of the parables.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-312  Life of Jesus  3 Credits  

A critical examination of the assumptions, history, methods, and conclusions of the so-called, "Quest of the Historical Jesus." We then interpret the data about Jesus against the history and culture of late Second Temple Judaism, followed by an examination of the meaning of Jesus' life and work.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-315  Gospel of Mark  3 Credits  

A study of the background, theology, community and literary significance of the Markan traditions of Jesus.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-320  Johannine Literature  3 Credits  

The meaning and message of the Gospel of John and I, II, and III John, including introductory studies concerning authorship, date, location, and occasion for the writings. Involves detailed exegesis of segments of the literature with a focus upon the significance of its theological content.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-325  Hebrews  3 Credits  

Content and interpretation of this important Christological text, stressing Bible study methods and resources and giving attention to background considerations in the biblical history of Jewish worship.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-330  General Epistles  3 Credits  

James, I and II Peter, and Jude-their contents, interpretation, distinctive teachings, and significance to the canon of the New Testament.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-340  Acts of the Apostles  3 Credits  

Exegesis of the Book of Acts with consideration of critical problems, alerting the student to basic issues in the history and theology of Luke-Acts and providing him or her with an outline of primitive church history.

Prerequisite: NT-101C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-346  Romans & Galatians  3 Credits  

Studies of the critical issues and contents of the Pauline corpus in the contexts of the life of the apostle and of the developing New Testament church. The following courses will be scheduled: NT 346 Romans and Galatians; NT 347 Corinthian Letters; NT 348 Prison Epistles: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon; NT 349 Pastoral Epistles: I and II Timothy, and Titus.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-347  Corinthian Letters  3 Credits  

Studies of the critical issues and contents of the Pauline corpus in the contexts of the life of the apostle and of the developing New Testament church. The following courses will be scheduled: NT 346 Romans and Galatians; NT 347 Corinthian Letters; NT 348 Prison Epistles: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon; NT 349 Pastoral Epistles: I and II Timothy, and Titus.

Prerequisite: NT-101C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-348  Prison Epistles  3 Credits  

Studies of the critical issues and contents of the Pauline corpus in the contexts of the life of the apostle and of the developing New Testament church. The following courses will be scheduled: NT 346 Romans and Galatians; NT 347 Corinthian Letters; NT 348 Prison Epistles: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon; NT 349 Pastoral Epistles: I and II Timothy, and Titus.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-349  Pastoral & Thess Epistles  3 Credits  

Studies of the critical issues and contents of the Pauline corpus in the contexts of the life of the apostle and of the developing New Testament church. The following courses will be scheduled: NT 346 Romans and Galatians; NT 347 Corinthian Letters; NT 348 Prison Epistles: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon; NT 349 Pastoral Epistles: I and II Timothy, and Titus.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-401  Advanced Greek I  2 Credits  

Reading and exegesis of Greek New Testament passages, selected to acquaint the student with the distinctive styles of the various authors of the New Testament. Some reading in the Apostolic Fathers and the Septuagint is also included.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

NT-402  Advanced Greek II  2 Credits  

Reading and exegesis of Greek New Testament passages, selected to acquaint the student with the distinctive styles of the various authors of the New Testament. Some reading in the Apostolic Fathers and the Septuagint is also included.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-446  Parables for Preaching  3 Credits  

An examination of the interrelationship between the meaning of the parables as Jesus spoke them to his original hearers and the message of parables proclaimed in the church today.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-462  Selected Themes/NT Theology  3 Credits  

An advanced course for the study of important theological concepts of the New Testament. The focus will be twofold: the orthodox understanding of major doctrines in the light of their first-century environment, and the development of a basic methodology that will guide the student in the practice of theological interpretation of the New Testament. Core requirement for the religion major offered every spring.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in New Testament. May be repeated for credit.

NT-472  Synoptic Gospels  3 Credits  

The study of the history and nature of the Synoptic Problem and the methods of Gospel research; and an overview of the content, characteristics, and theology of the first three Gospels.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

NT-480  Individual Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

NT-490  Seminar:  1-3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in New Testament of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

 Old Testament

OT-201  Old Testament Survey  3 Credits  

Prerequisite to all upper division courses in Old Testament. An introductory study of the literature of the Old Testament, with a view toward appreciation of its content and historical development, with emphasis on theological themes such as creation, election, and redemption. (required for all Religion majors; meets Religion/Humanities requirement for other majors).

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

OT-201C  Old Testament Survey  3 Credits  

Prerequisite to all upper division courses in Old Testament. An introductory study of the literature of the Old Testament, with a view toward appreciation of its content and historical development, with emphasis on theological themes such as creation, election, and redemption.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

OT-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic relating to the Old Testament. May be repeated for credit.

OT-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic relating to the Old Testament. May be repeated for credit.

OT-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic relating to the Old Testament. May be repeated for credit.

OT-306  Intermediate Hebrew I  3 Credits  

Review and consolidation of grammar and syntax. Extensive reading in the narrative portions of the Old Testament for style and vocabulary. Offered alternate years.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-307  Intermediate Hebrew II  3 Credits  

Review and consolidation of grammar and syntax. Extensive reading in the narrative portions of the Old Testament for style and vocabulary. Offered alternate years.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

OT-310  Psalms  3 Credits  

A study of selected Psalms, especially noting the structure, language, meaning, authorship, and historic setting of each.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

OT-320  Poetic & Wisdom Literature  3 Credits  

A study of the wisdom literature of the Old Testament with attention to the characteristic features and forms of Hebrew poetry and the role of wisdom in Israel. This course may include any of the following books: Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon.

Prerequisite: OT-201C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-330  Isaiah 1-39  3 Credits  

Studies in the lives and literature of the Hebrew prophets. The following courses in the prophets will be scheduled: OT 330 Isaiah 1-39, OT 331 Isaiah 40-66, OT 332 Jeremiah, OT 333 Ezekiel, and OT 334 Minor Prophets.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-331  Isaiah 40-66  3 Credits  

Studies in the lives and literature of the Hebrew prophets. The following courses in the prophets will be scheduled: OT 330 Isaiah 1-39, OT 331 Isaiah 40-66, OT 332 Jeremiah, OT 333 Ezekiel, and OT 334 Minor Prophets.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-332  Jeremiah  3 Credits  

Studies in the lives and literature of the Hebrew prophets. The following courses in the prophets will be scheduled: OT 330 Isaiah 1-39, OT 331 Isaiah 40-66, OT 332 Jeremiah, OT 333 Ezekiel, and OT 334 Minor Prophets.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

OT-333  Prophetic Literature: Ezekiel  3 Credits  

Studies in the lives and literature of the Hebrew prophets. The following courses in the prophets will be scheduled: OT 330 Isaiah 1-39, OT 331 Isaiah 40-66, OT 332 Jeremiah, OT 333 Ezekiel, and OT 334 Minor Prophets.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

OT-334  Minor Prophets  3 Credits  

Studies in the lives and literature of the Hebrew prophets. The following courses in the prophets will be scheduled: OT 330 Isaiah 1-39, OT 331 Isaiah 40-66, OT 332 Jeremiah, OT 333 Ezekiel, and OT 334 Minor Prophets.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-341  Genesis  3 Credits  

An examination of the historical and legal formulations in Genesis through Deuteronomy in light of recent archaeological finds and critical research. The following courses will be included: OT 341 Genesis, OT 342 Exodus, OT 343 Leviticus, OT 344 Numbers, and OT 345 Deuteronomy.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

OT-342  Exodus  3 Credits  

An examination of the historical and legal formulations in Genesis through Deuteronomy in light of recent archaeological finds and critical research. The following courses will be included: OT 341 Genesis, OT 342 Exodus, OT 343 Leviticus, OT 344 Numbers, and OT 345 Deuteronomy.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-343  Leviticus  3 Credits  

An examination of the historical and legal formulations in Genesis through Deuteronomy in light of recent archaeological finds and critical research. The following courses will be included: OT 341 Genesis, OT 342 Exodus, OT 343 Leviticus, OT 344 Numbers, and OT 345 Deuteronomy.

OT-344  Numbers  3 Credits  

An examination of the historical and legal formulations in Genesis through Deuteronomy in light of recent archaeological finds and critical research. The following courses will be included: OT 341 Genesis, OT 342 Exodus, OT 343 Leviticus, OT 344 Numbers, and OT 345 Deuteronomy.

OT-345  Deuteronomy  3 Credits  

An examination of the historical and legal formulations in Genesis through Deuteronomy in light of recent archaeological finds and critical research. The following courses will be included: OT 341 Genesis, OT 342 Exodus, OT 343 Leviticus, OT 344 Numbers, and OT 345 Deuteronomy.

OT-406  Advanced Hebrew I  2 Credits  

Syntactical and exegetical analysis of selected portions from the Hebrew Old Testament. Offered on demand.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-407  Advanced Hebrew II  2 Credits  

Syntactical and exegetical analysis of selected portions from the Hebrew Old Testament. Offered on demand.

OT-425  Women in the Books of Samuel  3 Credits  

This course will examine the books of 1 and 2 Samuel with particular emphasis upon the female characters that occur within the narrative, and the concurrent development of David's character as made evident in the biblical text through his significant relationships with women. The course will provide significant opportunity for students to acquire and improve interpretive skills appropriate to the narrative form of biblical text. Special attention will be given to the important contributions of the David narrative to a theology of kingship and the ethics of power usage within community, major themes in the books of Samuel.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-430  Women in Early Israel  3 Credits  

This course will examine the role of women in early Israel and the theological significance of their inclusion in the biblical text. ÿA major portion of the course will be devoted to the study of selected female characters occurring in the books of Genesis through Judges. ÿThe course will provide significant opportunity for students to acquire and improve interpretive skills appropriate to the narrative form of biblical text. ÿAttention will also be given to relevant cultural realities of women in the ancient Near Eastern world.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

OT-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in Old Testament. May be repeated for credit.

OT-472  Selected Themes/OT Theology  3 Credits  

An exploration of the meaning of, and limits for, biblical theology, together with the works of certain prominent scholars in the area; and of selected motifs in the Old Testament. Core requirement for the religion major offered every fall.

Prerequisite: NT-101C, OT-201C; THEO-101C or THEO-103C

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

OT-480  Individual Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

OT-490  Seminar:  3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in Old Testament of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

Pastoral Leadership Studies

PLST-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic in pastoral leadership. May be repeated for credit.

PLST-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic in pastoral leadership. May be repeated for credit.

PLST-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in pastoral leadership. May be repeated for credit.

PLST-310  Intro/Christian Leadership  2 Credits  

An introduction to a theology of leadership through the development of a healthy interior life; an understanding of a situational approach to leadership; and knowledge of the leader's role in the corporate vision, spirituality, and mission of the Christian community. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PLST-312  Intro/Pastoral Care  2 Credits  

Permission of the instructor for non-majors. An introduction to a theology of care and counsel as a central focus of leadership-lay and vocational-in the mission and ministry of the Christian community. Core requirement for the religion major offered every spring.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PLST-314  Intro/Preaching & Teaching  2 Credits  

An introduction to the proclamation mission of communicating the gospel through teaching and preaching. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Prerequisite: BINT-270, NT-101C, OT-201C; THEO-101C or THEO-103C/H

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PLST-347  Ministry and Media  3 Credits  
PLST-372  Res/Meth/Study/Ethics/Chrs Ldr  3 Credits  

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-406C  Music and Worship  3 Credits  

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-420  Disciplines/Spiritual Life  3 Credits  

A study of the biblical and theological foundations of spirituality within the Pentecostal/charismatic tradition. The emphasis will be on building a functioning spiritual life by the exercise of spiritual disciplines such as prayer, worship, community, fasting, and other disciplines. Core requirement for the religion major offered every fall.

Prerequisite: NT-101C, OT-201C; THEO-101C or THEO-103C/H

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

PLST-423  Sociology of Religion  1-3 Credits  

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-424  Pentecost-Charismat Movmnt  1-3 Credits  
PLST-425  Narrative/Expository Preaching  3 Credits  

An examination of narrative and expository preaching methods as complementary styles of preaching to strengthen pulpit ministry.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-430  Management/Christian Organztns  3 Credits  

Exploring effective management from a systems perspective that examines the internal processes of a learning organization as well as its relationship with the environment. Selected topics will also include recruitment and training of volunteers, conflict management, team building, planning and financial management, and legal issues.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-432  Women in Ministry  3 Credits  

An overview of the biblical and contemporary views on the leadership roles of women in the church, and the relevance of women in ministry for the modern church.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-440  Pastoral Care/Counseling  3 Credits  

The application of counseling and guidance principles to the work of the pastor and other religious workers in the field of pastoral care, including the use of case studies in ministering to persons with illness, grief, home, youth, or other types of special problems.

Prerequisite: PLST-312

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

PLST-446  Parables/Preaching  3 Credits  

An examination of the interrelationship between the meaning of the parables as Jesus spoke them to his original hearers and the message of parables proclaimed in the church today.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-449  Denominational Polity  1 Credit  

Guided reading and discussion of official district and national constitutions and bylaws, and research in denominational history and doctrine. Designed for students seeking ministerial credentials with the Assemblies of God.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

PLST-450  Ministerial Internship  3-12 Credits  

The internship program is a full-time, one-semester course of intensive in-service ministerial training in an assigned church under the supervision of a pastor and religion faculty member. Specific internship modules may also be taken during two, three, or four semesters. A maximum number of twelve units may be taken for internship credit. Note: Application forms are available in the Department of Religion office.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PLST-455  Current Issues/Youth Ministry  3 Credits  

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

PLST-457  Church Growth  3 Credits  
PLST-460  Practicum  1-3 Credits  

A learning experience which integrates classroom theory with practice through assigned responsibilities in local churches, hospitals, mission fields, or other appropriate institutions under supervision by both the on-scene administrator and the religion faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Note: Application forms are available in the Department of Religion office.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PLST-461  Integrative Field Studies  3 Credits  

Highly Recommended: PLST 450 or PLST 460A course designed to integrate theory with guided field experience in the student's chosen field. The intent is to reflect theologically in a ministry setting with special attention given to examining one's spiritual gifts, calling, identity, and preparation.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PLST-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in pastoral leadership. May be repeated for credit.

PLST-480  Ind Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

PLST-490  Seminar:  1-3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in pastoral leadership of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

Philosophy

PHIL-201  Introduction to Philosophy  3 Credits  

An introductory study which aims to provide a basic understanding of the nature and aims of philosophy, an acquaintance with some representative philosophical problems, an introduction to the methodology of philosophical inquiry, and a mastery of some of the terminology employed in philosophical discussion. This course does not fulfill a core curriculum requirement. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PHIL-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

PHIL-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

PHIL-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

PHIL-430  Ethics  3 Credits  

The course provides an introduction to a variety of ethical theories and systems in order to formulate alternative perspectives for ethical analysis and decision making.

PHIL-437  Philosophy of Religion  3 Credits  

The course employs philosophical methodology to examine the problems of the nature, limits, and validity of religious knowledge; the meaning of religious language; and the origin and nature of evil. This course does not fulfill a core curriculum requirement.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

PHIL-467  Beauty and the Christian Life  3 Credits  

An exploration of the category of beauty as it is variously addressed within the Bible, historic and contemporary Christian theology, and philosophy. These sources will be considered so that students may begin developing their own constructive theology of beauty.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

PHIL-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit.

Theology 

THEO-101  Foundations of Christian Life  3 Credits  

An introduction to Christian faith and life, embracing the primary theological tenets and fundamental values that empower a Christian to address contemporary cultural issues, seek integrity in personal behavior, and respond to the great commission to reach the world. (meets Religion/Humanities requirement)

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

THEO-101C  Foundations of Christian Life  3 Credits  

An introduction to Christian faith and life, embracing the primary theological tenets and fundamental values that empower a Christian to address contemporary cultural issues, seek integrity in personal behavior, and respond to the great commission to reach the world.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

THEO-103  Introduction to Theology  3 Credits  

An introductory study of the subject matter and scope of Christian theology. Examination is made of philosophical presuppositions, definition is sought for theological terms, and articulation of theological concepts is encouraged. Particular attention is given to the doctrinal tenets of the Assemblies of God. (Required for all religion majors/meets Religion/Humanities for all majors)

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

THEO-103C  Intro to Theology  3 Credits  

An introductory study of the subject matter and scope of Christian theology. Examination is made of philosophical presuppositions, definition is sought for theological terms, and articulation of theological concepts is encouraged. Particular attention is given to the doctrinal tenets of the Assemblies of God. Students majoring in Religion (any concentration) must take THEO-103C to fulfill the core curriculum requirement in theology.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

THEO-103H  Introduction to Theology Honors  3 Credits  

An introductory study of the subject matter and scope of Christian theology. Examination is made of philosophical presuppositions, definition is sought for theological terms, and articulation of theological concepts is encouraged. Particular attention is given to the doctrinal tenets of the Assemblies of God. This course is for honors students only.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

THEO-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic in theology. May be repeated for credit.

THEO-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic in theology. May be repeated for credit.

THEO-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in theology. May be repeated for credit.

THEO-300C  Developing a Christian World View  3 Credits  

This course surveys the history of philosophical worldviews and life narratives as a background for understanding the challenges involved in developing a theology and ethic accountable to the biblical witness but contextual in a given culture. Theological currents leading to postmodernity will be explored through the lens provided by the questions and encounters that emerge from both western and non-western Christian perspectives.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

THEO-300H  Developing a Christian World View  3 Credits  

This course surveys the history of philosophical worldviews and life narratives as a background for understanding the challenges involved in developing a theology and ethic accountable to the biblical witness but contextual in a given culture. Theological currents leading to postmodernity will be explored through the lens provided by the questions and encounters that emerge from both western and non-western Christian perspectives.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

THEO-301  Christian Ethics  3 Credits  

This course aims to investigate the moral implications of the Christian faith. Emphases will be placed on the theological nature of Christian ethical reflection, and the evaluation of specific moral issues from the vantage point of Christian faith.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

THEO-318  Systematic Theology I Anthropology, Christology, Soteriology  3 Credits  

Using Scripture and the church's historic theological wisdom, this course is a study of God's nature, the Trinity, creation, humankind as Imago Dei, the fall, Jesus Christ's person and salvific work, and the elements of salvation including justification, sanctification and glorification. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Prerequisite: NT-101C, OT-201C; THEO-101C or THEO-103C/H

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

THEO-320  Systematic Theology II: Pneumatology Ecclesiology, Eschatology  3 Credits  

This course covers Pneumatology, Eccelsiology, and Eschatology. ÿUsing Scripture and the church's historic theological wisdom this course is a study of the Holy Spirit's person, work, and gifts, the church's nature and vocation, and the last things, including the resurrection, final judgment, and new creation. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

THEO-415  Intro to Narrative Theology  3 Credits  

This course explores the implications of storytelling and narrative as a way of thinking about - and engaging in - the theological task. It is the assumption of this course that the conceptual categories of narrative are irreducible to other forms of thought and that they therefore represent a domain of knowledge, which possesses its own independent validity. Put differently, the think in story. For this reason, interpretation, which is sensitive to narrative form, may help to expose that value. It is the purpose of this course to develop the sensitivities necessary to understand this important dimension of religious expression.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

THEO-432  Women in Ministry  3 Credits  

An overview of the biblical and contemporary views on the leadership roles of women in the church, and the relevance of women in ministry for the modern church.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

THEO-437  Philosophy of Religion  3 Credits  

The course employs philosophical methodology to examine the problems of the nature, limits, and validity of religious knowledge; the meaning of religious language; and the origin and nature of evil. This course does not fulfill a core curriculum requirement.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

THEO-467  Beauty and the Christian Life  3 Credits  

An exploration of the category of beauty as it is variously addressed within the Bible, historic and contemporary Christian theology, and philosophy. These sources will be considered so that students may begin developing their own constructive theology of beauty.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

THEO-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in theology. May be repeated for credit.

THEO-480  Individual Studies:  1-3 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

THEO-490  Seminar:  3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in theology of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

THEO-499C  Theo/Min/Post-Chrstn Context  3 Credits  

Required of all religion majors during the senior year. This capstone course explores the changing role of pastoral, theological, and ethical reflection and practice in the contemporary context of shifting social realities. Particular attention is paid to the role of Pentecostalism within this matrix. Core requirement for the religion major offered every semester.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall and Spring.

Women and Justice Studies 

WJST-P345  Human Trafficking  3 Credits  

This course addresses trafficking based on the U.S. State Department model of Prevention, Protection, and Prosecution. Explores how trafficking happens, why it happens, and what can be done about it. For students interested in combatting human trafficking, this course offers a better understanding of professional career choices, as well as volunteer opportunities. The course includes guest speakers with in-depth knowledge and experience in the field from law enforcement and victim services. Counts as elective toward Women & Justice Minor.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-P440  Ethics & Human Trafficking  3 Credits  

This course will investigate ethical decision-making using the victim-centered, trauma-informed approach to human trafficking as a context. The course will explore how efforts to protect victims, prevent victimization, investigate and prosecute human traffickers and collaborate in multi-disciplinary task forces can be enhanced by recognizing significant ethical dilemmas occurring in the justice and victim services systems and addressing them directly, consistently and pragmatically. Students will learn how to identify ethical dilemmas and be provided with and apply ethical decision-making models in the context of biblical ethics and Christian virtues perspectives. Students will improve their ability to initially meet victims, perpetrators, colleagues and impacted agencies from their unique value systems, motivations and patterns of thinking and behaving.

Prerequisite: WJST-345 or consent of instructor

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-PNC345  Human Trafficking  0 Credits  

This course addresses trafficking based on the U.S. State Department model of Prevention, Protection, and Prosecution. Explores how trafficking happens, why it happens, and what can be done about it. For students interested in combatting human trafficking, this course offers a better understanding of professional career choices, as well as volunteer opportunities. The course includes guest speakers with in-depth knowledge and experience in the field from law enforcement and victim services. Counts as elective toward Women & Justice Minor.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-PNC437  Human Trafficking and Collaborations  0 Credits  

The issues around human trafficking partnerships will be explored. Both domestic and international collaborations challenges will be discussed. Topics examined will include understanding collaborations, how they can impact human trafficking efforts, prevention strategies, protection of victims, investigation and prosecurtion of cases and policies regarding labor trafficking. STudent will investigate different types of collaborative strategies and how to build effective partnerhsips to enhance anti-trafficking efforts.

Prerequisite: WJST-345

WJST-PNC440  Ethics & Human Trafficking  0 Credits  

This course will investigate ethical decision-making using the victim-centered, trauma-informed approach to human trafficking as a context. The course will explore how efforts to protect victims, prevent victimization, investigate and prosecute human traffickers and collaborate in multi-disciplinary task forces can be enhanced by recognizing significant ethical dilemmas occurring in the justice and victim services systems and addressing them directly, consistently and pragmatically. Students will learn how to identify ethical dilemmas and be provided with and apply ethical decision-making models in the context of biblical ethics and Christian virtues perspectives. Students will improve their ability to initially meet victims, perpetrators, colleagues and impacted agencies from their unique value systems, motivations and patterns of thinking and behaving.

Prerequisite: WJST-345 or consent of instructor

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-PNC442  Faith-Based Responses to Ht  0 Credits  

The issues around faith-based organizational (FBOs) responses to human trafficking will be explored. FBOs roles in anti-trafficking collaborations will be discussed, how they can contribute to prevention, protection of victims and human trafficking investigations and prosecutions. Strategies and policies for FBOs effective anti-trafficking work will be reviewed and suggestions for ongoing partnerships and activities that can positively impact anti-trafficking efforts.

WJST-110  Introduction to Women and Justice  2 Credits  

An introductory course to the study of women and contemporary gender issues in society. This course will focus on such issues as the necessity for the study of women, gender as a cultural construct, theological interpretations of gender, and gender as perceived in history and literature. This course is part of the core requirement for a minor in Women & Justice Minor.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

WJST-212  Ensure Justice Conference Studies  1 Credit  

Students are required to attend one conference sponsored by the Global Center for Women and Justice. A faculty member in the discipline covered by the conference theme will determine course work. May be repeated for credit.

WJST-345  Human Trafficking  3 Credits  

This course addresses trafficking based on the U.S. State Department model of Prevention, Protection, and Prosecution. Explores how trafficking happens, why it happens, and what can be done about it. For students interested in combatting human trafficking, this course offers a better understanding of professional career choices, as well as volunteer opportunities. The course includes guest speakers with in-depth knowledge and experience in the field from law enforcement and victim services. Counts as elective toward Women & Justice Minor.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-410  Research in Women's Studies  3 Credits  

This course is designed to assist the student in integrating the multi-faceted aspects of women's issues into a final paper. Working in cooperation with the professor, the student will design and methodically research and write a major paper that reflects an advanced understanding of women in the context of the chosen subject area. Papers from this class will be presented in a public colloquium toward the end of the semester and submitted for publication.

Prerequisite: WJST-110, WJST-212

WJST-420  Country Study Abroad: [Topical Area]  3 Credits  

Country study abroad opportunities provide intensive examinations of human trafficking in specific countries. The course requires a brief survey of the region with a focus on contemporary human trafficking and slavery as well as a review of relevant causes of exploitation specific to nations. Course work will be completed online and with in-country practicum designed to reinforce learning objectives. This course may be repeated for credit in new contexts. Additional fees will be required.

WJST-430  Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children  3 Credits  

This course is an introduction to the study of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children. The course will be organized around Prevention, Early Intervention, and Recovery. Theories of child development, prevention, violence, trauma, stages of change and resiliency will be useful to individuals who plan careers in areas such as elementary and secondary education, social services, child welfare, and juvenile justice. A primary focus of this course will be to identify strategies for early intervention with at risk and vulnerable youth.

WJST-432  Sex Trafficking  3 Credits  

The issues around sex trafficking will be explroed. Both domestic and international sex trafficking will be discussed. Topics examined will include understanding sex trafficking and its dynamics, prevention strategies, protection of victims, investigation and prosecuriton of cases using laws and policies regarding sex trafficking. STudents will explore how vulnerable and at-risk poulations of sex trafficking can be identified through various societal and cultural indicators.

WJST-434  Human Trafficking and Demand  3 Credits  

The issues around the demand for human trafficking will be explored. Both domestic and international demand dynamics will be discussed. Topics examined will include understanding types of deman related to various kinds of human trafficking, how demand impacts the extent of human trafficking, prevention strategies, protection of victims, investigation and prosecution of cases and policies regarding those who demand various kinds of human trafficking. STudent will determine how to describe the cultural and societal factors contributing to demand, and how they can work towards eliminating deman for the services and products resulting from human trafficking.

WJST-435  Human Trafficking Survivor Care  3 Credits  

Human Trafficking Suvivor Care (formerly known as Aftercare) is designed to help students examine the complex causes and holistic effects of human trafficking. In light of best practices, this course seeks to equip students with the knowledge needed to understand the holistic needs of human trafficking survivors as they begin their aftercare and restoration process. It will consider physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs in relation to culture, society, and trauma. This course will help students engage in best practices and tools used by leading practitioners in order to best serve and walk alongside human trafficking survivors as they move from crisis to self-sufficiency to thriving.

Prerequisite: WJST-345 or consent of instructor

WJST-437  Human Trafficking and Collaborations  3 Credits  

The issues around human trafficking partnerships will be explored. Both domestic and international collaborations challenges will be discussed. Topics examined will include understanding collaborations, how they can impact human trafficking efforts, prevention strategies, protection of victims, investigation and prosecurtion of cases and policies regarding labor trafficking. STudent will investigate different types of collaborative strategies and how to build effective partnerhsips to enhance anti-trafficking efforts.

Prerequisite: WJST-345

WJST-439  Human Trafficking Prevention  3 Credits  

The issues around human trafficking prevention will be explored. Both domestic and international prevention strategies will be discussed. Topics examined will include understanding partnerships impacting prevention efforts, protection of victims, investigations and prosecutions of cases and policies regarding human trafficking. Student will explore different types of prevention challenges and models and determine which prevention activities and proceesses may enhance anti-trafficking efforts in their locations and areas of expertise.

WJST-440  Ethics & Human Trafficking  3 Credits  

This course will investigate ethical decision-making using the victim-centered, trauma-informed approach to human trafficking as a context. The course will explore how efforts to protect victims, prevent victimization, investigate and prosecute human traffickers and collaborate in multi-disciplinary task forces can be enhanced by recognizing significant ethical dilemmas occurring in the justice and victim services systems and addressing them directly, consistently and pragmatically. Students will learn how to identify ethical dilemmas and be provided with and apply ethical decision-making models in the context of biblical ethics and Christian virtues perspectives. Students will improve their ability to initially meet victims, perpetrators, colleagues and impacted agencies from their unique value systems, motivations and patterns of thinking and behaving.

Prerequisite: WJST-345 or consent of instructor

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-442  Faith-Based Reponse to Human Trafficking  3 Credits  

The issues around faith-based organizational (FBOs) responses to human trafficking will be explored. FBOs roles in anti-trafficking collaborations will be discussed, how they can contribute to prevention, protection of victims and human trafficking investigations and prosecutions. Strategies and policies for FBOs effective anti-trafficking work will be reviewed and suggestions for ongoing partnerships and activities that can positively impact anti-trafficking efforts.

Prerequisite: WJST-345

WJST-445  Labor Trafficking  3 Credits  

The issues around labor trafficking will be explored. Both domestic an international labor trafficking will be discussed. Topics examined will include the extent of the problem and its relation to other forms of human trafficking, prevention strategies, protection of victims, investigation and prosecution of cases, policies regarding labor trafficking, and partnerhips and collaborations impacting labor trafficking locally and globally.

Prerequisite: WJST-345 or consent of instructor

Terms Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

WJST-447  Human Trafficking/Smuggling of Migrants  3 Credits  

The issues around human trafficking and the smuggling of migrants will be explored and discussed. Risk factors and circumstances leading to populations being vulnerable to being exploited while attempting to migrate to other countries and internally displaced will be explored. The course will review how the smuggling of migrants can lead to human trafficking and propose alternate strategies for identifying smuggled migrants and preventing them from being exploited in human trafficking and other transnational crime.

Prerequisite: WJST-345

WJST-449  Human Trafficking Grant Management  3 Credits  

The issues around human trafficking grant writing and management will be addressed. Federal, State and Foundation grant opportunities will be discussed. Topics explored will include finding grant opportuntiites, how to effectively write grants that address the topics solicited, submission of grants, and how to manage grants received for anti-trafficking efforts. Students will determine different types of collaborative strategies to enhance grant submissions and how to build effective partnerships to enhance grant writing and management efforts.

WJST-450  Global Center for Women and Justice Internship  1-3 Credits  

Students select an internship from the repertoire of projects the Global Center for Women and Justice is currently working on. Students may alternatively choose an externship with one of GCWJ's partner organizations. Students earn one course of credit for every 30 hours of interning. Course credit also requires short readings and reflection papers. Course may be repeated once. Students need to be on the WJST Minor track.

WJST-452  Women's Studies Teaching Internship  1-3 Credits  

Regular hours each week for classes and/or meetings are established at the beginning of the semester. The intern will assist the instructor in course-related activities. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 units. Open to juniors or seniors with a GPA or 3.0 or above with the permission of the instructor.

WJST-455  Research Assistantship  1-3 Credits  

The undergraduate research assistantship engages students in original research projects of the faculty or student's own design. Its aim is to apply those skills learned in prior research design and methodology coursework and/or expand on these as appropriate to the student's skill set. The student assistant will be assigned to work on various steps of the research process from the formulation of the problem through the analysis of the data and preparation of the research report in written and/or oral formats. A research agenda will be developed with each student, which then becomes the guide for the class. Students will meet with instructor weekly to discuss findings and progress. May be repeated for credit up to 6 units.

WJST-470  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

This course concentrates on a particular issue relevant to Women's Studies students such as gender theory, gender pedagogy, women's health, women and patriarchy, women in business, or motherhood. May be repeated for credit as new course topics are developed.

Youth Leadership Studies 

YLST-291  Special Topic:  1 Credit  

Study of a special topic in youth leadership. May be repeated for credit.

YLST-292  Special Topic:  2 Credits  

Study of a special topic in youth leadership. May be repeated for credit.

YLST-293  Special Topic:  3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in youth leadership. May be repeated for credit.

YLST-324  Intro/Youth Ministry  2 Credits  

A development of a theology and philosophy of youth ministry with attention given to the developmental needs of adolescents as well as the character and cultivation of the youth minister.

Terms Typically Offered: Fall.

YLST-345  Camp Leadership  3 Credits  

The study of the organization and direction of various camping and recreational situations. Leadership principles are integrated into a working model of recreation and camping for both Christian and secular fields of employment.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

YLST-455  Current Issues/Youth Ministry  3 Credits  

An exploration of adolescent development, culture, and socialization as an integration point for effective youth ministry. Discussion of current issues in youth ministry will serve to provide students with foundations necessary for contemporary youth ministry.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.

YLST-460  Practicum  1-3 Credits  

A learning experience which integrates classroom theory with practice through assigned responsibilities in local churches, mission fields, or other appropriate ministries under supervision by both the on-scene administrator and the religion faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Note: Application forms are available in the Department of Religion office.

YLST-470  Special Topic:  1-3 Credits  

Study of a special topic in youth leadership. May be repeated for credit.

YLST-480  Individual Studies:  1-4 Credits  

May be repeated for credit.

YLST-490  Seminar:  1-3 Credits  

Mutual investigation of one topic in youth leadership studies of particular relevance to upper division religion majors. May be repeated for credit.

Terms Typically Offered: Spring.